Special Projects Fund
About

In 2015-16, the IERCD began the process of annual designation of general funding to be used toward design and facilitation of mission-focused but otherwise underfunded or unfunded projects within District boundaries, collectively referred to as "Special Projects Funds." IERCD accepts applications for a wide variety of mission-focused project types, including, but not limited to: 

  • Sustainable Agriculture

  • Natural Resources Conservation

  • Forestry and Fire Preventions

  • Education Programs relating to the promotion of natural resources stewardship 

We are currently not accepting any proposals for the upcoming fiscal year.

View Past Projects:
Pebble Plain Acquisition Assistance (2016-2017)

Applicant: San Bernardino Mountains Land Trust (SBMLT)

Summary: The IERCD has been involved in the preservation of the rare pebble plain habitat endemic to the Big Bear Valley since 2010 when first asked to join the multi-entity land acquisition/conservation working group. The working group contains representation from many public and private entities, and works to acquire and protect pebble plain habitat through development of passive recreational and educational opportunities associated with its protection. 

Project work at this point consisted of remittance of the remaining funding needed for acquisition of the 240 acre target property, known as the Sawmill Canyon Pebble Plain. The property joined adjacent properties under federal and non-profit ownership including 302 acres controlled by the United States Forest Service and 166 acres controlled by the San Bernardino Mountains Land Trust. IERCD funds were added to $2.5 million secured from the Wildlife Conservation Board for acquisition.

Highland Springs Seeding (2016-2017)

Applicants: Highland Springs Ranch and 123 Farms

Summary: During the summer of 2016, wildfire burned approximately 400 acres of annual grassland consisting primarily of non-native Bromus diandrus in the foothills of Highland Springs Ranch. The area has historically been used for cultivation and possessed little habitat value. However, the burn provided an opening to perform efficient restoration over a select 10-A test plot through a combination of additional invasive treatment, seed application, and follow-up maintenance, monitoring, and reporting by students in IERCD's SLEWS Program, as well as IERCD and Highland Springs staff.

The California Invasive Plant Council (Cal-IPC) has demonstrated that a two year consecutive burn cycle will eliminate 99.9% of Bromus diandrus seed in a given area. A combination of natural invasives control with managed removals and active seeding was projected to restore functions of the 400-A site for the benefit of site soils and area wildlife. The project lasted two years, with the first year consisting of invasive suppression followed by seed broadcasting. Year two consisted of ongoing maintenance and monitoring to control invasive species reintroduction as much as possible. IERCD staff continues to provide annual monitoring and collect data on native and invasive cover over the 40 test plots. 

Outcome: A total of eight acres were seeded using the conservation seeder and an additional two acres were hand seeded by students in the SLEWS Program. Overall the post fire blooms have shown great success both from the seeding restoration and natural recruitment of native seed that already existed in the seed bank.

El Casco Lakes Tamarisk Removal (2016-2017)

Applicant: San Bernardino Mountains Land Trust (SBMLT)

Summary: The IERCD has been involved in the preservation of the rare pebble plain habitat endemic to the Big Bear Valley since 2010 when first asked to join the multi-entity land acquisition/conservation working group. The working group contains representation from many public and private entities, and works to acquire and protect pebble plain habitat through development of passive recreational and educational opportunities associated with its protection. 

Project work at this point consisted of remittance of the remaining funding needed for acquisition of the 240 acre target property, known as the Sawmill Canyon Pebble Plain. The property joined adjacent properties under federal and non-profit ownership including 302 acres controlled by the United States Forest Service and 166 acres controlled by the San Bernardino Mountains Land Trust. IERCD funds were added to $2.5 million secured from the Wildlife Conservation Board for acquisition.

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